The Pew Research Center for the People & the Press Poll Database
Search Help

Search for — Use the first text field to search for combinations of words and phrases. By default only questions that include all of your search terms are returned. Boolean searches are allowed so feel free to use and�s or or�s. You may also use the wildcard (%) symbol to expand your search (i.e., 'environment%' instead of 'environmental or environmentalist'). It you are looking for an exact phrase, simply put quotation marks around your search terms.

Topic — A pull down menu of topics is available to help focus your search. You may select the default "Any topic" or select a single topic.

Dates — Enter the target data range by using the standard mm/dd/yyyy format. If you are looking for a specific date enter that date into both boxes.

 
BOOLEAN LOGIC
Boolean logic uses the terms "and," "or," and "not" as connectors between keywords or phrases to narrow the results of keyword searches. Searches can be further refined through the use of parentheses. Some examples of Boolean searches:
Examples using "or" / "and" –
Keyword(s) in "Search for" field Search results
prescription All questions containing the word "prescription" in the question wording.
prescription social security All questions containing all words "prescription" and "social” and “security" in the question wording.
prescription “social security” All questions containing the word "prescription" and the phrase "social security" in the question wording.
prescription or “social security” All questions containing either "prescription" or "social security" in the question wording.
prescription and “social security” All questions containing both "prescription" and "social security" in the question wording.
prescription and social security and medicare All questions containing "prescription" and "social” and “security" and "medicare" in the question wording.
 
Examples using parentheses –
Keyword(s) in "Search for" field Search results
(prescription and “social security”) or (prescription and medicare) All questions containing either "prescription" and "social security" or "prescription" and "medicare" in the question wording.
prescription and (“social security” or medicare) Same.
(“social security” or medicare) and prescription Same.
(prescription and “social security”) or medicare All questions containing both "prescription" and "social security" in the question wording, or the word "medicare"
(prescription and “social security”) or (prescription and medicare) All questions containing either "prescription" and "social security" or "prescription" and "medicare" in the question wording.
 
Examples using "not" –
Keyword(s) in "Search for" field Search results
prescription not “social security” All questions containing "prescription" but not "social security" in the question wording.
prescription not medicare All questions containing "prescription" but not "medicare" in the question wording.
(prescription not “social security”) and (prescription not medicare) All questions containing "prescription" but neither "social security" nor "medicare" in the question wording.
prescription not (“social security” or medicare) Same.
((prescription and “social security”) or medicare) not income All questions containing both "prescription" and "social security" in the question wording, or containing medicare in the question wording, but not containing "income" in the question wording.
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USE OF WILDCARDS
The Pew Research Center for the People & the Press Poll Database uses the percent sign (%) as a wildcard symbol. You can use the wildcard when you wish to search on different forms of the same word without having to specify each form in the "Search for" field. For example, enter "ethic%" when you wish to find questions containing "ethic," "ethics," "ethical," or "ethically."

Some keywords present problems in wildcard searching. If you are doing a search on international trade agreements, you might be inclined to search on "import%" to find questions containing "import," "imports," "imported," or "importing," but such a search will also retrieve thousands of questions containing "important" or "importance." In a case like this, it is better to enter all the different forms of your keyword separately, or use the "not" option to rule out the words you do not want included in the search.

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