MISSION

The mission of the Roper Center is to collect, preserve, and disseminate public opinion data; to serve as a resource to help improve the practice of survey research; and to broaden the understanding of public opinion through the use of survey data in the United States and around the world.

Who We Are

The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research is the largest archive of public opinion data in existence. The Center holds data dating back to the 1930s and from over 100 nations.

The Roper Center is a public opinion archive — it preserves the data from polls conducted by many leading survey organizations for the use of researchers, students, and journalists. Read more about the purpose of the Center.
Elmo Roper founded the Roper Center just after World War II. He and George Gallup played leading roles in its subsequent development. The survey organizations they established have continued to contribute their polls to the Center’s library, and scores of other survey organizations in the United States, and many foreign countries, have followed their example. Read more about the history of the Center.

Quick Access

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Dataset is available using RoperExpressSEARCH DATASETS

Recent Posts

See America First: Public Opinion and National Parks

The National Parks Service is 100 this year. To celebrate, go camping – or take a look back at over sixty years of polling about […]

New to the Archive: HSPH/RWJF Subethnicities Survey 2007

The Harvard School of Public Health/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Subethnicities Survey 2007 covered public health topics and featured an unusual sample of the many diverse […]

Good Fences, Good Neighbors: Public Opinion on Border Security

Donald Trump has called for the erection of a wall between Mexico  and United States, part of his campaign focus on greatly increased border security. Data from the Roper Center archive shows that, despite concerns about efficacy, public opinion on such a proposal over the past three decades has moved from majority opposition to nearly even division. […]