MISSION

The mission of the Roper Center is to collect, preserve, and disseminate public opinion data; to serve as a resource to help improve the practice of survey research; and to broaden the understanding of public opinion through the use of survey data in the United States and around the world.

Who We Are

The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research is the largest archive of public opinion data in existence. The Center holds data dating back to the 1930s and from over 100 nations.

The Roper Center is a public opinion archive — it preserves the data from polls conducted by many leading survey organizations for the use of researchers, students, and journalists. Read more about the purpose of the Center.
Elmo Roper founded the Roper Center just after World War II. He and George Gallup played leading roles in its subsequent development. The survey organizations they established have continued to contribute their polls to the Center’s library, and scores of other survey organizations in the United States, and many foreign countries, have followed their example. Read more about the history of the Center.

Quick Access

Search US questions with iPOLLSEARCH iPOLL

Dataset is available using RoperExpressSEARCH DATASETS

Recent Posts

New Data Provider: Centro de Estudios Públicos (CEP)

Roper Center is proud to announce that Centro de Estudios Públicos (Center of Public Studies) – CEP, a leading public opinion research organization in Chile, is now a data provider. New datasets from CEP’s National Public Opinion Survey have already been added to Roper’s collection of CEP surveys from the 1980s and 1990s, and more polls will be available soon. […]

2017 Mitofsky Award: Call for Nominations

The 2017 Warren J. Mitofsky Award for Excellence in Public Opinion Research

An annual award of The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research at Cornell […]

Most Important Problem Dataset

Colton Heffington, Brandon Beomseob Park and Laron K. Williams, 2017.

Public opinion researchers depend on certain questions as essential public opinion barometers, like presidential job approval or Bud Roper’s right-direction/wrong-track measure. Perhaps no other question is as often used to determine what is foremost in the minds of the public than the open-ended “What do you think is the most important problem facing this country today?” Respondents offer their concerns in their own words, unaffected by potential bias introduced by limited lists of answers. […]