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Time Sharing Experiments in the Social Sciences (TESS)

Since 2001, TESS has been supporting general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences.

Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose survey-based experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society. TESS pays standard data collection and data dissemination costs, enabling researchers to concentrate on the production of ideas.

Under the 2020-2023 NSF grant for TESS, Roper Center will be archiving the previous ten and next three years of datasets and questions, making this work more visible to a broad range of researchers and increasing reuse and citation. To ensure the experimental framework for questions is provided to researchers, each question will be curated with extensive information about the experimental context.

The current principal investigators of TESS are Jeremy Freese (Stanford University) and James Druckman (Northwestern University) and fieldwork is conducted by NORC's AmeriSpeak® panel. TESS was started by Arthur Lupia (University of Michigan) and Diana Mutz (University of Pennsylvania).