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Women

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Issue Brief

Madame President: Public Attitudes

Changing Public Attitudes on a Woman President As the front runner in the Democratic primary, Hillary Clinton has already come closer than any other woman to becoming President of the United States. From the earliest days of public opinion research, polls have been documenting the country’s shift from rejection to skepticism to acceptance of the idea of a woman president. 

Madame President: Changing Attitudes about a Woman President

As the front runner in the Democratic primary, Hillary Clinton has already come closer than any other woman to becoming President of the United States.

Then and Now: First Ladies

There are few roles in American politics that are as visible and yet as nebulous as that of First Lady.

Women In The Workplace

Where We Live – WNPR by Lydia Brown (John Dankosky and Chion Wolf contributed to this show) The Equal Pay Act of 1963 was designed to close the wage gap between men and women. More than 50 years later, however, discrimination against female workers continues to persist. This hour, we take a closer look at wage inequality in our state. We ask our panel of experts why unequal pay is still so common in the workplace, and what’s being done eliminate it. Later in the program, our new series, Topline, looks at public attitudes toward female executives. We explore decades of polling data to find out whether Americans prefer to have men or women in charge. GUESTS:

The Changing Role of Women

A major political party has for the first time ever a woman, Hillary Rodham Clinton, as the front runner for President of the United States. So much has changed regarding the role of women in politics and in society, changes that can be tracked through the lens of public opinion surveys, which for over three-quarters of a century have asked Americans their opinions of the role of women in politics and the working world in general. The first time Gallup asked the public about a woman in the White House was in 1937 when only 1 in 3 said they would support a woman presidential candidate. Today, 95% of voters would support a well-qualified woman to lead the country.

Related Data

Attitudes of American Women 1962

The 1960’s are a decade characterized by social change, counterculture, and civil disobedience.

Charts & graphics

Vote for woman for president
Preference for gender of boss
Women’s perceptions of discrimination
Men’s perceptions of discrimination against women